Building the Next Generation Container OS

Use immutable infrastructure to deploy and scale your containerized applications. Project Atomic provides the best platform for your Linux Docker Kubernetes (LDK) application stack.

Project Atomic introduces Atomic Registry — a free and open source enterprise container registry. Manage your containers without third party hubs.

Learn more!


Atomic Host

Based on proven technology either from Red Hat Enterprise Linux or the CentOS and Fedora projects, Atomic Host is a lightweight, immutable platform, designed with the sole purpose of running containerized applications.

To balance the need between long-term stability and new features, we are providing different releases of Atomic Host for you to choose from.

Get Started

Atomic App and Nulecule

With Atomic App, use existing containers as building blocks for your new application product or project. Using existing containers to provide core infrastructure components lets you focus more on building the stuff that matters and less time packaging and setting up the common plumbing required.

Define your Atomic Apps with the Nulecule specification to compose and distribute complex applications.

Learn more about Atomic App

Learn more about Nulecule

Atomic Registry

An enterprise Docker container registry solution run on-premise or in the cloud.

Atomic Registry uses 100% open source technology to provide enterprise features such as role-based access control (RBAC), diverse authentication options, a rich web console, flexible storage integration and more.

Get started with Atomic Registry

Community News

Set Up Remote Access for Docker on Atomic Host

This post will describe how to set up remote command-line access for the Docker daemon running on an Atomic host. This will let you run docker ps, docker run and other commands from your desktop and manage a server.

We are also going to secure the Docker daemon with TLS (transport layer security) since we are connecting remotely. Before you carry on with the following steps, keep in mind that any process on the client that can access the TLS certs now has full control of the Docker daemon on the server and can do anything it wants to do. So, only copy those certificates to client hosts completely under your control.

Read More »

Kubernetes is back in Fedora Atomic 25 base

TL;DR: If you are a production user of Kubernetes on Fedora Atomic Host, you can now upgrade to Fedora Atomic Host 25. Kubernetes 1.4 is part of the base image now.

Per our previous announcement, we wanted to make a change to Fedora Atomic Host, and in concert with the Kubernetes community move to an entirely containerized install of Kubernetes, which would make it easier for users to choose their Kubernetes version or distribution. However, some of the upstream technical issues with that change...

Read More »

Looking forward to working with containerd

A number of folks have asked for my thoughts on the Docker containerd announcement last week. While containerd itself is not new, having been announced over a year ago, we were happy to see that Docker Inc. is now spinning this out as an independent project. This is aligned with Red Hat’s overall goal to drive open industry standards for Linux containers and the work that we’ve helped drive as a leading contributor to the Docker project, a founding member of the Open Containers Initiative, and...

Read More »

» View older news

Ready to try Atomic?

Get Started